CAMERA’S WEEKLY WAKE-EM-UP

 

MAX LINDER FALLS 100 FEET IN ALPS CREVASSE AND HOVERS NEAR DEATH

 

 

   While on a farewell pleasure trip in the Swiss Alps prior to departing from Europe for Hollywood, where he has arranged to resume his picture-making activities. Max Linder, France’s premier cinema star and one of the world’s foremost screen comedians, was overwhelmed by an avalanche of ice and snow which swept over a precipice into a crevasse one thousand feet below. Unconscious, he remained in this precarious position for several hours before his dog, which had escaped the onrush, attracted mountaineers by its barking.

   When, after great difficulty, Mr. Linder was rescued with the aid of ropes and he was removed to a hospital in Lausanne, the attending physicians thought at first the actor’s neck was broken but X-ray examination revealed the vertebrae as uninjured, although the muscles and tendons were dangerously twisted and caused the patient most excruciating pain.

   The first cable dispatch received in Hollywood indicated that the doctors entertained very slight hope for saving Mr. Linder’s life and stated that his neck had been broken. Consequently, his many friends were shocked immeasurably. However, a second cablegram the following day announced that although he continued in a critical condition, it had been ascertained that his neck was not broken. However, both of the star’s arms were fractured and he sustained serious internal injuries, the outcome of which is still in grave doubt.

   It had been Mr. Linder’s plan to arrive in Los Angeles about January 26th in order to get his next production under way by the middle of February. Now it is uncertain as to when he will be able to travel. He has been in France for several months, having gone there with the idea of making a picture. However, inadequate studio facilities and unsettled political conditions precluded the possibility of his carrying out his plans and he had made all arrangements to return to the Southern California field when the unfortunate accident occurred. (Camera, Jan. 20, 1923) [Compiled by Joe Moore with assistance from the special collections staff of Arizona State University, Tempe AZ.]