voriger Film  <<          Filme            >>  nächster Film  

 

Une conquête

Weitere Titel: Ein schlecht belohnter Verehrer (D, Ö)/ A conquest (UK, USA) - Regie: Charles Decroix - Szenario: Charles Decroix - Kamera: (Emile Pierre?)* - Länge: 130m - s/w - Interpreten: Max Linder {Gontran}; Jane Frémaux - Produktion: Le Film d'Art - Vertrieb: Pathé Frères - Katalog-Nr.: 3116/Okt.09 - Auff.: 5. September 1909 (Graz/ Grazer Bioskop) — Weitere Auff.: 9.10.09 (Herne/ Kinematoscope); 22.10.09 (Paris/ Le Cirque d’Hiver)

                 ————————————————————————————————————

Ein feingekleideter Herr sieht ein hübsches Fräulein und benutzt sein Taschentuch, das er auf die Erde wirft und der Dame als das ihrige aufhebt, um Ansprache an das Fräulein zu haben. Wie vorauszusehen, muß sie ihm antworten, daß dies Tuch nicht ihr gehört. Er bietet ihr bei dieser Gelegenheit die Begleitung an, die sie abweist. Er verfolgt sie jedoch unablässig und will sich der Dame beliebt machen, indem er ihr alles mögliche kauft, um das dieselbe frägt. So kauft er ihr Blumen, Figuren, sogar einen Hund, welche Geschenke die Dame nicht annimmt und er ein riesiges Pech mit dem Hund hat, der ihm fortwährend entfliehen will. Er kauft noch einen Stoff, den die Dame kaufen wollte, in den er sich mit seinen Füßen ganz verwickelt. So von dem Hund gezerrt, die Figuren zerschlagen, den Zylinder ruiniert, kommt er bis zur Wohnung der Dame. Hier zahlt er noch den Kohlenhändler, der gerade aus der Türe tritt, und glaubt sich endlich am Ziele seiner Wünsche als er ins Zimmer eintritt. Doch o Schreck, das Fräulein ist eine Frau und der zornige Gatte entfernt den Zudringling mit einem Fünfkronenstück, das er ihm für seinen weit größeren Schaden großmütig gibt, aus dem Zimmer. Für die Standhaftigkeit seiner Frau gegen den zudringlichen Verehrer umarmt der Gatte seine Frau. (Kinematographische Rundschau, 16.9.1909)

                 ————————————————————————————————————

This comedy is as clever and laughable as the preceding is weak. Moreover, it introduces again a very popular Pathe comedian, who has been frequently praised in these reviews. A young man ardently admires a pretty woman on the street, but she will have nothing to do with him. Refusing to be repulsed, he follows along, and whenever she admires any article of merchandise he promptly purchases it, loading himself down with bundles. Among other things he buys a big dog that has attracted her admiration. When she reaches home he is there, too, with his load of presents, only to find that she has a giant husband who promptly kicks him downstairs. (The New York Dramatic Mirror, Apr. 2, 1910)

                 ————————————————————————————————————

Gontran, apercevant dans la rue une jolie femme, suivant la tactique d’un suiveur professionnel, laisse tomber son mouchoir et aborde la dame: “Pardon, Madame, vous avez perdu ceci… la dame examine l’objet, se récuse - Mais non Monsieur, il n’est pas à moi - En effet, Madame, c’est le mien. Je l’ai laissé tomber pour avoir le plaisir d’engager la conversation avec vous” Sur cette déclaration sans pudeur, la dame s’éloigne avec dignité. Notre ami Gontran ne se décourage pas et s’élance sur les fins talons de l’élue, dont il cherche à prévenir les moindres désirs. C’est ainsi qu’il arrive, chargé comme un baudet, une statuette et un bouquet de roses mutilées sous un bras, un abat-jour en bracelet, empêtré dans une pièce d’étoffe et dans la laisse d’un gros chien au domi­cile de sa conquête. Là, après avoir subi diverses avanies, il parvient enfin à pénétrer chez sa Dulcinée où il est reçu par le mari qui l’envoie rouler dans les escaliers sous l’avalanche de ses acquisitions. Mme Frémeaux et M. Max Linder, les excellents artistes du Vaudeville et des Variétés, sont les interprètes irrésistibles de cette pièce franchement gaie de M. Charles Decroix. (Henri Bousquet, Catalogue Pathé des années 1896 à 1914, Bures-sur-Yvette, Editions Henri Bousquet, 1994-2004)

 

 

* Anmerkung: Eine eventuelle Beteiligung vom Kameramann Emile Pierre wird in Cinémagazine, 4.1.1924 erwähnt: "Puis il entra au «Film d'Art» où il tourna différents films avec Decroix, ..., De Morlhon et Max Linder." ― Note: A possible participation of cameraman Emile Pierre is mentioned in Cinémagazine, Jan. 4, 1924: "Puis il entra au «Film d'Art» où il tourna différents films avec Decroix, ..., De Morlhon et Max Linder."]

Eine Kopie des Films wird verwahrt in: Archives du Film du CNC (Bois d'Arcy), bfi/National Film and Television Archive (London)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weitere Filmbeschreibungen/Kritiken:

 

Gontran, ein verliebter Schürzenjäger, folgt einer hübschen Dame, lässt sein Taschentuch auf Erde fallen und redet die Dame an. „Verzeihen Sie, gnädige Frau, Sie haben ihr Taschentuch verloren.“ Die Dame betrachtet das Taschentuch und gibt es ihm dann mit den Worten zurück: „Es gehört mir nicht.“ Gontran gesteht ihr dann, das er den Streich ersonnen habe, um ihre Bekanntschaft zu machen. Auf diese freche Erklärung hin, dreht sich die Dame um und lässt Gontran einfach stehen. Doch dieser verliert nicht den Mut und folgt ihr. Er ist ihr fortgesetzt auf den Fersen und bemüht sich alle ihre Wünsche in ihren Augen zu lesen. So kommt es, dass er schliesslich wie als Esel beladen an der Wohnung der Schönen ankommt. Unter vielen Mühen gelingt es ihm Zutritt in die Wohnung zu erhalten, wo er von dem Gatten der Verfolgten empfangen und ohne Gnade zur Tür hinausgeworfen wird. (Katalog Pathé, 1909)

                 —————————————————————

Of all M. Max Linder's amusing exploits in his numerous roles this, perhaps, is the most humorous. The pursuit of the tender passion has never led him into more hopelessly inextricable complications than in the present picture, where he follows a captivating female through the streets, making the most various and extravagant purchases. Laden with these, he staggers up the stairs of her house, the parcels bursting open and the contents hanging in festoons about him, until, in a much damaged condition, he gains the top - to be met by a large and muscular gentleman, her husband, who insists upon an immediate departure. (The Bioscope, Sept. 23rd 1909)

                 —————————————————————

A short reel (350 feet) discloses a better comedy idea than is usually worked out in twice that length. A “masher” on the street is smitten with a young woman. He follows her and everything she stops to look at he buys. Within a short time he is laden with a bunch of flowers, a piece of statuary, a huge dog and a troublesome bolt of cloth which becomes undone and trips him at every step. Still he continues the pursuit, even into the young woman’s apartment. Here he is met by her father (or husband). The dandified “masher” drops all his purchases in bewilderment while the young woman and her relative laugh at him. To make his humiliation complete the relative pretends to believe that he is a delivery boy and forces a piece of money upon him as a tip for his labor and then throws him out. The laughs work up to a good climax and the knockabout of the “masher” carries laughs through the whole subject. Rush. [=Alfred Rushford Greason] (Variety, April 2nd 1910)

                 —————————————————————

George, passing a pretty woman, has recourse to the trick of dropping his own handkerchief, and hurrying after her, making her believe that he thinks it hers. Despite rebuffs, George keeps after the beauty, ready to offer any assistance, and we therefore see him arriving at the lady's house laden with numerous bundles. Thinking, however, that he is to be rewarded for the humiliation and inconvenience that he has suffered. George enters the house smiling, only to be met by the woman's husband, who promptly kick the officious stranger down the steps. (The Billboard, Mar. 26, 1910)

                 —————————————————————

George, passing a pretty woman in the street, has recourse to that old-time trick of dropping his own handkerchief and hurrying after her, making believe that he thinks it is hers. On examining the handkerchief, the beauty returns it. telling George that it does not belong to her. He then confesses that he knows very well that it is not her property, as it happens to be his own, and his offering it to her was only an excuse to make her acquaintance, so struck was he by her beauty. Upon this frank declaration the young woman draws herself up haughtily, but George is not to be discouraged, but follows closely behind her. ready to be of any assistance on- the slightest pretext. We therefore see him arriving at the lady's house laden down with such articles as a lampshade, a statuette, a bunch of roses, a bundle of dress goods, and. in addition, leading an enormous dog on a leash, against whose attacks he is endeavoring to protect himself. Thinking, however, that the tet-a-tete which he expects to have with the beauty now that they have reached her home Is well worth all the humiliation and inconvenience that he has suffered, George enters the house smiling like a basket of chips, only to be met by the woman's husband, who promptly kicks the officious stranger down the steps. (Moving Picture World, Mar. 26, 1910)

An amusing picture which depicts graphically and forcibly the punishment meted out to a masher who annoyed a beautiful woman and was allowed to see her home, only to be unceremoniously kicked down the steps by her husband. (Moving Picture World, Apr. 16, 1910)