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La flûte merveilleuse

Weitere Titel: Die wunderbare Flöte (D, Ö)/ The Magic Flute (UK)/ Max makes music (USA) - Regie: (Max Linder) - Szenario: Max Linder - Länge: 155m - s/w, teilweise viragiert - Interpret: Max Linder - Produktion: Pathé Frères - Katalog-Nr.: 3840/Okt.10 - Auff.: 1. Oktober 1910 (Graz/ Bioskop Theater Annenhof) — Weitere Auff.: 4.11.10 (Paris/ Omnia Pathé)

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Max hat eine wunderbare Flöte erstanden, mit der er alle die ihn hören, nach seinem Willen tanzen lassen kann. Nacheinander nach der Melodie eines Walzers, eines Cake-Walk und Matchiche läßt Max ein exerzierendes Batallion tanzen, eine Hochzeitsgesellschaft, einen braven Bürger das Opfer von Apachen, der sich erholt und zu tanzen anfängt trotz des Messers in seinem Leib. Max wird wegen nächtlicher Ruhestörung zur Wache mitgenommen und läßt dort die Schutzleute Matchiche tanzen. Dann kehrt er heim und vorm Einschlafen läßt er die Möbel, die Familienbilder, den Hund des Hauses tanzen und der Meister der Flöte selbst schließt sich dem Schlußgalopp an. (Der deutsche Lichtbildtheater-Besitzer, 13.10.1910)

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An old idea is given a new appearance in this farce by the graceful Max Linder's characteristic work. He buys a magic flute, the music from which has the power of causing people to dance. Max tries its influence on the drilling soldiers, the fighting drunkards, the young ladies posing for their pictures, the man who has just been murdered, and various other beings, including a little dog. The finishing scene, in which he plays the flute in bed and causes the furniture and pictures to dance into a general mix-up is not so happy. One could almost see the wires by which the objects were moved. (The New York Dramatic Mirror, Mar. 8, 1911)

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Max achète une flûte qui possède le pouvoir de jouer tous les airs de danse ou autres que vous désirez. Il essaie ses pouvoirs sur un escadron de jeunes recrues. Le résultat est parfait et Max va expérimenter un air de cake-walk sur un cortège de mariage qui pose devant un photographe. Celui-ci, en se retournant, est consterné en voyant le groupe qu’il avait artistiquement mis en place complètement disloqué. Max ensuite arrive devant un homme qui vient d’être attaqué par des bandits. Sur le corps inanimé, il se met à jouer et l’homme se redresse et… se met à danser. Mais les sons attirent des agents de police qui veulent arrêter Max. Celui-ci leur échappe et retourne chez lui où un petit chien est assis sur une marche. Nouvel air de flûte et l’animal se met gravement à danser. Max enfin rentre chez lui pour se reposer mais la flûte entame un air nouveau et bientôt, les chaises, la table, les portraits, le lit et Max lui-même se mettent à virevolter. (Henri Bousquet, Catalogue Pathé des années 1896 à 1914, Bures-sur-Yvette, Editions Henri Bousquet, 1994-2004)

 

 

 

Music for the Picture, by Clarence E. Sinn, The “Cue Music Man”: MAX MAKES MUSIC (Pathe). ―1. Lively till after handbill is shown. When merchant plays flute: ―2. About four bars of reel for dance. ―3. When Max plays for soldiers "La Sorella" till all off. ―4. When he plays for girls, first time, "break;" second time, same. ―5. Third time, slow cake walk till all off. ―6. Eccentric for drunken men till Max enters; when he plays: ―7. "Waltz Me Around Again Willie" till all off. Then: ―8. Mysterious-pizzacato (staccato). ―9. Short agitato for knockdown. ―10. When Max plays, slow reel till both exit. ―11. When he plays for dog, slow reel. (Any old reels or dances will answer, such as "Turkey in the Straw," "Chicken Reel," or "Arkansaw Traveler." Play them rather slowly and marked.) ―12. When he plays while in the bed, lively "Rag March" till finish. "Fill-in" ad libitum. (Moving Picture World, Mar. 11, 1911)

Eine Kopie des Films wird verwahrt in: Cineteca del Friuli (Gemona)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weitere Filmbeschreibungen/Kritiken:

 

Max buys a flute, which is guaranteed to make all who hear its music dance until further orders, and he tries its powers upon a squad of recruits. The results are perfect, and Max experiments in a cake-walk within the hearing of a wedding group posing for a deaf photographer. When the latter turns, he is dismayed at the demoralisation of his artistically posed group. Max then happens upon a man who has been stabbed by hooligans. Over his dead body Max blows his flute, the dead man arises, and is soon dancing. The noise attracts the police, who arrest Max. He escapes and returns home where a little dog is sitting on the step. The flute is again brought into action, and doggie performs a grave little dance. At length Max retires to rest, and in his room plays another tune which causes the portraits, chairs, tables, bed, and even Max himself, to dance. (The Bioscope, Sept. 22nd 1910)

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Our old friend Max is seen ambling down the street on pleasure bent, when he is stopped by an old fellow, who sells him a magic flute. All who hear the music from the reed can not help dancing. Those who know Max can imagine the result. Puppy dogs dance the sailors' hornpipe, and a group of sweet girl graduates, who are posing for a photographer, fall under the mystic spell and – do they dance? Well, yes! On he goes, turning sorrow to joy, making every one happy, including the spectators of this film, which ends with Max in bed, piping away on his flute, while the chairs, tables and bed do a can-can around the room. (The Film Index, Mar. 4, 1911; Moving Picture World, Mar. 4, 1911; The Billboard, Mar. 4, 1911)

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A flute which has telling effect on people when they hear it played, causes mild laughter. The idea is well worked up. (Variety, Mar. 4, 1911)

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A good reel-filler. Not particularly' novel, but quite funny and worked up with spirit. The final scene was a good climax, but the scene itself lacked a climax. (The Nickelodeon, Mar. 11, 1911)

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[...] And nowhere is there room for more raving, either way, than in the realm of comedy. Comedies which are not funny are so common as to need little comment, but when one finds a poster reading, "A great laugh producer — everybody has to laugh at this one" and goes in and pays one's nickel or dime and is rewarded with "Max Makes Music," and comes out with a sad wonder at the type of humor possessed by the people who get these things up, one is inclined to get pessimistic about the moving picture as a cure for the blues! When a producer has to assume an impossibility as a basis for his humor, he is pretty hard pressed. If flutes, the playing of which caused all hearers to dance, regardless of their occupations, were known to the world of music, doubtless "Max Makes Music" would be funny. But, save for the mythical flute of the dear old Pied Piper of Hamlin, no such instrument is known — to the writer at least — and the fact that we see well trained actors and actresses gravely dancing as Max plays this magic flute is not convincing — let alone funny. Even the producer must have recognized the absurdity of trying to get a laugh from his audiences by such means, for after having Max pipe soldiers to dance during drill, a bridal party being photographed, curing the drunk and raising the dead with his piping. Max is made to pipe to a dog, which also dances, and finally to the furniture in his bed room, the bed finally dancing Max out on the floor being the shrieking climax to this scream of humor — not! Ugh! [...] (SEEN ON THE CURTAIN, By Freelance, Moving Picture World, May 20, 1911)