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Max comes across

Weitere Titel: Max Linder geht nach Amerika (Ö)/ Max Linder goes to America (UK)/ Max part en Amérique (F) - Regie: Max Linder - Szenario: Max Linder - Kamera: Arthur E. Reeves - Länge: 600m(/30 Min.) - Interpreten: Max Linder; Marthe Mansfield; Ernest Maupin {Victor}; Helen Ferguson, Mattie Comont - Produktion: Essanay - Drehzeit: Dez./Jan. 1916/17 (Chicago) - © 30.1.1917 - Sondervorführung: 6.2.1917 (New York/Loew's New York «Trade show») - UA: 18. Februar 1917 (New York/ The Strand) — Weitere Auff.: 10.10.19 (Paris/ Salle Marivaux); 31.12.20 (Wien/ Zirkus Busch Kino)

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Eine angenehme Ueberraschung brachte die Vorführung des Polo-Filmvertrieb mit dem zweiaktigen Max Linder-Lustspiel Max Linder geht nach Amerika … einer von tollster Situationskomik getragenen Burleske, in welcher der beliebte Künstler wieder allen Traditionen getreu wird. Bemerkenswert ist, daß dieses Bild von der amerikanischen “Essanay-Film-Cie.” hergestellt ist, also Maxens erste Schöpfung in der “Neuen Welt”, und konnte konstatiert werden, daß der amerikanische Einschlag den Linder-Filmen nur zum Vorteile gereicht. Die außerordentliche Beweglichkeit der amerikanischen Komparsen bildet die geeignetste Ergänzung zu Lindners Spielart. (Neue Kino-Rundschau, 16.10.1920)

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A trade showing of the first Essanay-Max Linder comedies was given on the New York Roof Tuesday morning. It is entitled "Max Comes Across" and a leader announces it was written and directed by the French picture star. In many respects Linder is his old self, albeit a trifle older than in the former Pathe days. The picture opens showing him being manicured and massaged in his apartment in Paris. He is waited on by an emissary of Essanay with a contract calling for 2,000,000 francs, though the period of the contract is not mentioned. Max agrees to come to America. At the last moment he reads of the sinking of numerous vessels and orders his servants to pack a life belt in each trunk. On board he sees some flashes disporting themselves and raises the cry of submarines. His roommate on board gives orders to be awakened at five A. M. to see the sun rise, telling the steward not to fail to dress him and carry him on deck, under any circumstances. Max has the upper berth and feels ill, whereupon him companion changes places, so that the steward has a rough and tumble battle, carrying Max on deck in misfit clothes. There is a lot of questionable seasickness stuff, some very funny business with the saloon piano that slides back and forth while Max plays at the concert, a collision, with all hands ordered to the lifeboats, and so on. Apparently Linder is as funny and as expressive as of yore, but the scenario for his first American-made release gives him small opportunity to exercise his well-known talents. Future Essanay-Linder releases will have to be much funnier than the initial one if Linder is to rehabilitate himself as one of the world's foremost screen comedians. Jolo. (Variety, Feb. 9, 1917)

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C'est le premier film que notre comique francais nous donne depuis la guerre. Nous retrouvons Max à peu près tel qu'il nous a quittés, mais, par contre, nous voyons dans son scénario un américanisme qui n'est peut-être qu'une concession. Mais cela n'est pas pour nous déplaire puisqu'en poussant le comique jusqu'à l'extrême Max Linder ne commet pas ces fautes de goût qu'on trouve chez beaucoup de comiques. (Je ne parle évidemment pas de Charlie Chaplin.) Max part donc pour l'Amérique et c'est au temps des sous-marins. Max est poltron, sans cela il ne serait pas comique et il est accompagné d'un personnage aussi poltron que lui. Tous deux veulent en même temps se faire une bonne farce et demandent au capitaine de faire l'alerte au sous-marin. La fausse alerte a lieu. Les deux pltrons s'étonnent par leur crânerie, mais soudain le danger devient réel. Adieu belles attitudes... Evidemment ce sont les épisodes qui font tout. Ils sont variés et plaisants et Max n'a perdu aucune de ses qualités d'expression. - BOISYVON (L'Intransigeant, 16.10.1919)

 

 

 

Eine Kopie des Films wird verwahrt in: Archiva Nationala de Filme (Bucuresti), Filmoteca de la Generalitat de Catalunya (Barcelona)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weitere Filmbeschreibungen/Kritiken:

 

Lustspiel mit ausgezeichnet humoristischen Szenen Linders am Schiff während seiner Überfahrt nach Amerika. (Ein Schlager.) (Paimann's Filmlisten №236, [≈14.10.1920])

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Max, it seems, got here in one reel – one very brief, but very active, reel. And Max brought with him, aside from the forty-seven varieties of trunks which the Essanay Company has been apprising us for 10 these many moons, a facile face that is a screen marvel. He uses no make-up, no moustache nor cane, no derby hat, no sagging pantaloons, save for a couple of scenes. Max is comedian enough, if the prayers of his financial backers are answered, to tickle the hearts of the American public without the Chaplin dress. He is Chaplinesque in that he stumbles and falls and is dragged around, but he is stiff rather than limber; and his face is mobile rather than expressionless. The varieties of his facial twists are infinite as the stars, and quite as brilliant. One reel is a disappointing thing to show Max up in, however, for his first American picture. Everything he does is good, clean, broad comedy, but one reel is just about half enough. Seasickness in crossing to America is the central plot, which is not plot, but action. The concert in the cabin, with a rough sea to contend with, gives Max his chance for doing something new with a piano. It scoots hither and thither on the rolling floor, with the intent Max following on the stool in a mad attempt to keep up with the ever wandering ivories. It is the best thing in the film. So far Max has been allowed an opportunity for very limited exploitations of his indubitable facial genius. If one reel is funny then, logically, two would be funnier; so we shall contain ourselves until further Linder exhibitions before growing effulgent. - L.H. (Billboard, Feb. 17, 1917)

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Max Linder in Film at the Strand – … Max Linder made his American debut at the Strand yesterday in a comedy called “Max Comes Across.” In it Linder portrays a long-haired musician who braves the dangers of the deep in the war zone, and when the ship on which he is a passenger is bombarded he is too frightened to do anything save hide under the piano. So it happens that he is the only one left on the vessel when the captain discovers that it was a false alarm. Max declares that he stayed to play the piano and in that way prevent a panic. The other passengers, who had climbed back from the lifeboats, take him at his word and he is proclaimed a hero and marries the beautiful heiress. (New York Tribune, Feb. 19, 1917)

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AFTER viewing "Max Comes "Across," Max Linder's first two-reel comedy in the big Essanay series, I awoke to the fact that I had been enjoying myself immoderately, and that Mr. Linder's humorous powers to evoke laughter are still irresistible. It seems to me that he has grown in power as a magic mirth-maker since last seen, and that this is so impresses me as being all the more wonderful when I think of the fearful scenes both in trench and on embattled field, which have en-gripped him since his former appearances in this country before the camera. There can be no such thing as an analysis of his work, except that he writes his own scenarios, and directs and acts in them first as the whim seizes him. He is distinctly a creature of fancy, whose mission lies in presenting the ludicrous in kaleidoscopic fashion, and with such appeal that the spectator is lost to everything but mirth and laughter. And all credit to Mr. Linder, his art to create laughter does not rely on vulgar incident or situation. The incidents which form this first comedy supposedly occur during Mr. Linder's voyage from Paris to this country to join the Essanay forces. Accompanied by his friend Maupain the voyage is made, although Max is badly frightened by an item of war news which states that twelve more ships of the Entente have just been sunk by German submarines. He orders a life belt placed in every trunk and a life belt with every meal taken on board! He mistakes the play of two dolphins for an approaching torpedo one day, and stirs his co-passengers into a frenzy of fear. The attack of seasickness which seizes his friend Maupain and himself results in uproarious fun for the spectator. In the search for his own cabin he enters that of a passenger and his wife, which leads to another paroxysm of mirth. The services of Max as pianist at a special concert given aboard ship affords one of the most mirthful incidents during the voyage. A storm comes up and the piano slides backward and forward across the salon, with Max either in hot pursuit or in quick retreat; but he always contrives to stick to the piano stool, although in its mad gyrations it is sometimes turned upside down. To get even on his friend, Maupain, Max induces the captain to have an attendant shout at his cabin door that the ship is sinking, not knowing that Maupain had already won over that officer to play the same trick on himself, at the very same hour. Then an actual collision takes place in mid ocean, and the cry, "Everybody on deck, the ship is sinking," arouses the passengers from their slumbers. Max and his friend smile, each to himself, as the cry is heard, ignorant of danger. But when an officer tells them of the accident there is wild scampering and a desperate fight between them for a life belt. Max discovers that the ship is out of danger, and seating himself at the piano in his saloon plays an inspiriting selection. The captain and passengers rush in, marveling at the nerve of the hero, who on being questioned modestly answers, "I was playing the piano to give the passengers courage"! James S. McQuade. (Moving Picture World, Feb. 24, 1917)

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Theme deals with the supposed adventures of Max on a trip across the Atlantic to work in Essanay pictures. Before they embark, a report of the sinking of a liner by a submarine gives Max and his friend, Ernest Maupin, an idea for a practical joke on each other. Max persuades the captain of the vessel to make Maupin believe a U-boat has torpedoed the Espagne; simultaneously Maupin persuades the captain to make Max believe the same thing: A few moments later a freight steamer rams the Espagne. The passengers rush to the decks in terror. Max and Maupin, however, believe it is their joke. They discover, though, the truth and both fight for the only remaining life preserver. Maupain gets it and rushes on deck. Max finds himself locked in the salon. He is terror-stricken. Meantime in the hold of the boat the sailors are battling with the onrushing water. They stop up the leak and all is safe. Max hears the captain reassuring the passengers. His terror passes. He seats himself at the piano and is playing a lively tune when they find him. Max is proclaimed the hero of the moment. All the girls aboard kiss Max. (Motography, 10.3.1917)

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Un Max Linder amusant: Max part pour l'Amérique aux temps héroïques des torpillages; incidents de voyage fort drôles; frousse de Max et de son compagnon de voyage; le piano qui se ballade par un gros temps; le bateau qui coule. Max Linder, cependant, ne fait pas oublier Charlie Chaplin dont les dernières productions gagnent encore en comique d'observation et en profondeur. Charlot est un grand artiste. Irénée Mauget (L'Afrique du Nord illustrée, 15.11.1919)