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Max ne se mariera pas

Weitere Titel: Max bleibt ledig (D, Ö)/ Max Misses Another Good Chance (UK)/ Max is stuck up (USA) - Regie: (Lucien Nonguet) - Szenario: Max Linder - Länge: 155m - s/w - Interpret: Max Linder - Produktion: Pathé Frères - Katalog-Nr.: 4059/Jan.11 - Drehzeit: vor Nov. 1910 - UA: 31. Dezember 1910 (Österreich, Auff. in „Rotenturm-Kino"/Wien am 6.1.1911) — Weitere Auff.: 4.2.11 (Berlin/ Excelsior-Lichtspiele); 3.3.11 (Paris/ Omnia Pathé)

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Daß Max als Freier stets Pech hat, wissen wir schon lange. Jetzt hat er ein reizendes Mädchen gefunden und begibt sich zum Verlobungsessen. Was wird nun wieder passieren? Wir sehen ihn korrekt zuvorkommend das Heim der zukünftigen Schwiegereltern betreten, aber - er ist auf ein Stück Papier mit Fliegenleim getreten, und vergeblich, immer mit höflich lächelnder Miene, versucht Max sich davon zu befreien. Der verdammte Leim bleibt an seinen Fingern haften, beschmutzt seine Kleidung und der Aermste kämpft verzweifelt mit seinem Glase, Messer und Gabel, welche nicht wieder von seiner Hand loswollen. Max verliert nun infolge seiner schlechten Haltung wieder eine reizende Braut. Aber er wird nicht mutlos und wir sehen in einem anderen Bilde die weiteren Abenteuer des unermüdlichen komischen Freiers. (Deutscher Lichtbildtheater-Besitzer, 2.2.1911)

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This does not mean that Max is filled with egotistical pride, but that he gets involved in a few sheets of flypaper on the way to dine with his lady. He gets stuck up for fair in trying to extricate his hands, feet and person from plates, tumblers, napkins and tablecloths, and at last lands on top of a baker's man and gets even more adhesive material. Max, the genial gentleman, rises above all this debris and impossible situations and makes one amused in spite of himself. (The New York Dramatic Mirror, Mar. 29, 1911)

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Max a déjà manqué trois riches mariages. Cette fois, il a découvert une délicieuse jeune fille et se rend au repas des fiançailles. Il franchit, correct et irréprochable le seuil de ses futurs beaux-parents mais… il marche sur un papier tue-mouches! Et c’est en vain qu’il essaie, tout en gardant sur son visage un sourire de commande, de se débarrasser du maudit papier. La glu colle à ses doigts, poisse ses vêtements, le couvre d’un enduit tenace et le malheureux convive se débat désespérément contre son verre, son couteau, sa fourchette qui s’obstinent à lui rester dans la main. Grâce à sa mauvaise tenue, le pauvre Max perd une fois de plus une charmante fiancée. (Henri Bousquet, Catalogue Pathé des années 1896 à 1914, Bures-sur-Yvette, Editions Henri Bousquet, 1994-2004)

 

 

 

Eine Kopie des Films wird verwahrt in: Deutsche Kinemathek (Berlin) Der Film war Teil der Serie "Les Films Max Linder" (TV 1995) (-"-/Max heiratet nie, 1911, 6:15); Der Film wurde veröffentlicht auf DVD "The Comedy of Max Linder" (Max Gets Stuck Up, 1906, 3:05) Ein Ausschnitt des Films ist enthalten in: L'homme au chapeau de soie (Dokumentation, 1983); Le Temps de Max (TV-Dokumentation, 2000).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weitere Filmbeschreibungen/Kritiken:

 

Max sets out to win the heart of a charming maid, but he has the misfortune, whilst making a purchase in a pastrycook's shop, to carry away with him a sticky fly-paper. It attaches itself to his fingers, his coat, and his boots, and Max tries frantically to rid himself of his appendage. He has by this time entered his charmer's house, and the family a last sit down to dinner. But Max's hands are thoroughly sticky by now, and his fork, his glass, and his serviette alternately stick to them. Max greatly incenses the head of the family by what the latter presumes to be his impertinence, and he is kicked out and relinquishes all hope of winning a partner. (The Bioscope, Jan. 12th 1911)

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To all lovers of photoplays, the name of Max Linder means a good, hearty laugh, and in Pathe's latest picture of "friend" Max, you can bank on several fits of laughing gas being administered to the audience. Max's latest stunt is to get "stuck up"—not the kind of "stuck up" you mean, such as thinking himself a little loftier from a social standpoint, but the sticky stuck up sort of stuff flypaper. You know of recent date, Max has been getting in all sorts of trouble, and on more than one occasion has caused his sweetheart to become embarrassed. She—like all true sweethearts— forgive him, and this time invites him to dinner at her home. In her invitation she tells him not to meet with any mishaps, but to look as nice as a little boy, just out of a bandbox. Max takes the hint, and puts on his best and smartest suit, and proceeds to a candy store to purchase a box of the best. It being summer, the confectioner deems it wise to place flypaper on all the chairs, counters and even on the door. Max, of course, didn't see these little novelties, and before he is aware of it, he has a nice fresh piece plastered on his shoe. The confectioner helps him out of the first difficulty, but neither notice the piece that is stuck on his sleeve when he goes out. Max arrives at the home of his sweetheart, where he is introduced to her father. Here is where real complications arrive, for no sooner does he attempt to shake hands with papa than he finds out there is something sticky holding him back. Papa looks strangely at Max, and Max tries to look pleasant at papa, but it's a hard job. After the old man leaves the lovers together, Max still tries to conceal his predicament; but when she asks him to hook her collar he finds his fingers more than thumbs and that they won't work on such a delicate job. Finding it utterly useless his sweetheart does it herself, and tells Max to follow her to the dining-room, as dinner is ready. Before Max really gets out of the room he tries to get the flypaper off his fingers by putting his foot on it. He starts to follow his sweetheart, but takes part of the rug along, and by the time he reaches the table, he has nearly all the furniture tagging after him. Getting rid of these, he soon has the plates, platters, glasses, knives and forks stuck to his fingers. This causes not only his sweetheart and mamma much embarrassment, but father, too, loses his temper, and before Max can really tell his troubles, he finds himself thrown out of the house. The film is a laugh from start to finish, and is one of the best pieces of comedy Max has done in a long time. (The Film Index, Mar. 18, 1911)

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Max is invited to a dinner party. On his way he stops at the baker's to secure a few choice confections, and while there steps on a piece of sticky fly paper. With great solicitude the baker asks Max to sit down while he removes the offending bit of paper. This Max does, but unfortunately deposits himself upon a similar piece of paper which Is on the chair. This, too is removed by the now excited baker, but Max manages to carry off with him a nice large, sticky piece fastened on his sleeve. This he discovers at his sweetheart's home and in endeavoring to remove it, he gets it fastened to both hands and both feet. Nobody but a contortionist could ever get rid of those terrible pieces of paper, and to add to Max's misery, when he gets to the table he finds that having picked up his fork he cannot get loose of it. His glass, too, sticks to his hands and when his future father-in-law passes him a platter, Max cannot let loose and the entire party gets embroiled over who shall have the platter. Any one who has seen Max can readily understand that this comedy film is a scream from start to finish. (The Film Index, Mar. 25, 1911; Moving Picture World, Mar. 25, 1911; The Billboard, Mar. 25, 1911)

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Another impossible Max comedy. It may be funny to get tangled up in fly paper, but it would be impossible for anyone to have such an experience as this. Max evidently has a peculiar sense of humor, but it would be better if it were directed into channels which are more in accord with the dictates of common sense. (Moving Picture World, Apr. 1, 1911)