voriger Film  <<          Filme            >>  nächster Film  

 

Le pacte

Weitere Titel: Der Vertrag (D, Ö)/ The Pact (UK)/ Max in a dilemma (USA) - Szenario: Emile Boucher - Länge: 155m - s/w, teilweise viragiert - Interpret: Max Linder {Max} - Produktion: Pathé Frères - Katalog-Nr.: 3395/Febr.10 - UA: 11. Februar 1910 (Wien/ Welt-Biograph Theater) — Weitere Auff.: 20.3.10 (Magdeburg/ Die weiße Wand); 13.5.10 (Bordeaux/ Théâtre Français)

                 ————————————————————————————————————

Der junge Max, der das Herz voll Liebe aber leere Taschen hat, wirbt um die Hand seiner Cousine. Aber der Vater des jungen Mädchens verweigert sie ihm. Verzweifelt beschliesst der junge Mann, sich das Leben zu nehmen. Aber es fehlt ihm der Mut dazu. Glücklicherweise kommt ihm Hilfe in Gestalt eines Strolches. Dieser, der gekommen ist um zu stehlen, erklärt sich bereit den jungen Mann in der Nacht von seinem Leben zu befreien, und sie machen einen Vertrag. Inzwischen erfährt Max, dass er eine grosse Erbschaft gemacht hat. Er eilt nun hocherfreut zu seiner Cousine und alles klärt sich nach seinem Wunsch auf ... Aber es kommt jetzt jemand, der seine Freude stört, und dieses ist der Strolch. Max ergreift angsterfüllt die Flucht. Doch der Vagabund folgt ihm, holt ihn ein, und Max überlässt sich nun seinem Schicksal. Er will ihm aber nicht das Leben nehmen, sondern er will ihm nur das Geld zurückgeben, welches er für die Ausführung des Mordes bekommen hatte. (Der deutsche Lichtbildtheater-Besitzer, 10.3.1910/Katalog Pathé)

                 ————————————————————————————————————

There is more than the usual wit and cleverness in the plot of this Max Linder farce, played with this comedian's usual grace. Having been denied the girl of his choice because he is too poor to support her, he determines on suicide, and, lacking courage to shoot or stab himself, he hires a burglar to do the job before midnight. But his plans are suddenly changed when a lawyer informs him that he is heir to a dead uncle's millions. He rushes to his sweetheart and is accepted by her parents, entirely forgetting his pact with the burglar. When that individual shows up Max flees in dismay and fear, only to find on being overtaken that the burglar has hunted him up to refuse the job. In this film, as in many other Pathe French productions, we are given sub-captions locating the events in America; dollars instead of francs are mentioned, and the uncle dies in Chicago. It would be undoubtedly better if the consistencies were maintained in such cases. Even the children recognise the French scenes and notice the discrepancies. (The New York Dramatic Mirror, Nov. 16, 1910)

                 ————————————————————————————————————

Max aime Catherine mais le père de celle-ci préfère un bon compte en banque qu’un cœur aimant. Max déses­péré cherche à se tuer, mais son courage l’abandonne au moment critique. L’arrivée d’un apache lui donne une idée. Il lui offre 500 francs à la condition que l’homme le tue avant minuit. Entre-temps, une lettre arrive qui informe Max qu’il vient d’hériter d’une grosse fortune. Tout heureux, Max retourne chez les parents de Catherine et est invité à dîner. Au cours du repas, un homme est annoncé en qui Max reconnaît son voleur. Il s’enfuit mais le voleur le rattrape et… lui rend son argent en déclarant qu’il ne veut pas risquer sa tête pour lui faire plaisir! (Henri Bousquet, Catalogue Pathé des années 1896 à 1914, Bures-sur-Yvette, Editions Henri Bousquet, 1994-2004)

 

 

 

Eine Kopie des Films wird verwahrt in: Archives du Film du CNC (Bois d'Arcy), Cinémathèque Française (Paris)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weitere Filmbeschreibungen/Kritiken:

 

This is an amusing picture, played by Mr. Max Linder, which is in no way likely to endanger his reputation as a humorist. In a condition of dire poverty he nevertheless proposes for a fair maiden's hand; but, although she is willing to give her consent, her father, a gentleman of stern and forbidding appearance, makes strong and decided objections to the alliance, and turns the wretched Max summarily into the street. The poor youth goes home and attempts a horrid suicide, but his courage fails him and he employs a burglar - who puts in an opportune appearance - to undertake that he shall be dead by midnight in return for a consideration of money. Immediately the thief has departed, however, a solicitor enters to inform Max that he has become the heir to an enormous fortune. Overjoyed, he rushes back to the home of his beloved and announces his good fortune. He is now the honored guest and dear friend of his prospective father-in-law, and all goes merrily until the servant enters to say that someone has called to see Mr. Linder. He rises from the table and goes to the next room, where he is horrified to find the burglar who has promised to kill him. Immediately he turns and flies from the place, hotly followed by the thief, who pursues him, wildly brandishing a tremendous knife, previously given to him by Max for the execution of the bloody deed. The chase continues for a long time, and eventually the flying lover is caught, only to learn that the burglar has repented of his contract and wishes, with an honesty surely somewhat unnatural, to restore the knife and the money. (The Bioscope, Feb. 24th 1910)

                 —————————————————————

Little Max would marry the ideal of his dreams but her papa frowns on the suit. Max would kill himself, but lacks the nerve. Max hires a burglar to put him out of the way before midnight for $100. The offer is accepted. Meanwhile Max receives word that he has been left a fortune. He rejoices, wins over the prospective father-in-law and worships at the woman’s shrine. The burglar attempts the work of killing Max, but has to give it up as a bad job. Some of the comedy is amusing. Mark. (Variety, Nov. 12th 1910)

                 —————————————————————

Max is in love with Kitty, who is willing, but whose father regards a substantial bank balance as of more importance than a loving heart. Max, rejected, returns to his chambers and would like to die, but his courage fails him at the critical moment. He is interrupted in his reflections by a burglar. At the sight of Sykes, Max becomes inspired and offers him the sum of $500 to kill him before midnight. The thief agrees and departs. A new arrival now appears, who turns out to be a lawyer, who has called to inform Max that a large fortune has been left him by his uncle. Transported with joy, Max hastens to inform Kitty's father, and is, of course, immediately accepted, and invited to dinner. During dinner a servant announces that a visitor wishes to speak to Max. He goes to meet the newcomer and is horrified to recognize Sykes, whose existence he had temporarily forgotten. With a cry he dashes out into the street, runs for dear life, is overtaken, and tremblingly awaits his death blow. Judge of his happiness and surprise when Sykes coolly hands him back his $500, saying at the same time that he is not going to risk his precious neck simply to do Max a favor. (The Nickelodeon, Nov. 1, 1910; The Film Index, Sep. 24, 1910 & Nov. 12, 1910 ; Moving Picture World, Sep. 24, 1910 & Nov. 12, 1910; The Billboard, Nov. 12, 1910)

                 —————————————————————

Sometimes one receives a succession of shocks from unexpected sources that disturb one's equanimity. Max was rejected by the girl's father because his bank balance was infinitesimal. Then he hires a burglar to kill him, only to receive notice shortly afterward that he has fallen heir to a large fortune. Acceptance by the erstwhile obdurate parent, and the accompanying festivities are interrupted by the aforesaid burglar who apparently has come to fulfill his agreement. But after a gong chase he succeeds in handling back the check with the observation that he will not risk his neck to do anyone a favor. Thus, eventually, all difficulties are removed and Max escapes both horns of a very bad dilemma. (MPW, Oct. 8, 1910) & A story which has been told before, and not so very long ago. The burglar, after a long chase, gives back the $500, thinking it hardly worth risking his neck for. (MPW, Nov. 19, 1910)