voriger Film  <<          Filme            >>  nächster Film  

 

Quel est l'assassin

Weitere Titel: Wer ist der Täter (D, Ö)/ Who Did the Deed (UK)/ Who killed Max? (USA) - Regie: (Max Linder) - Szenario: Max Linder - Länge: 215m - s/w - 6 UT - Interpret: Max Linder - Produktion: Pathé Frères - Katalog-Nr.: 3926/Nov.10 - UA: 15. Oktober 1910 (Österreich, Auff. in „Welt-Biograph Theater“,Wien am 23.10.1910) — Weitere Auff.: 16.11.10 (Berlin/ Excelsior-Lichtspiele); 15.12.10 (Paris/ Cinéma du "Petit Journal")*

                 ————————————————————————————————————

Nach einer tollen Nacht kommt Max mit einem gehörigen Schwipps nach Hause und, total von Sinnen, amüsiert er sich damit, die Kunstgegenstände im Zimmer mit dem Revolver herunterzuschießen. Er rollt schließlich, die Waffe zur Seite, inmitten der Unordnung der Erde, und am folgenden Morgen erblicken ihn seine verzweifelten Eltern. Sie glauben, ihr Sohn sei ermordet worden und holen den berühmten Detektiv Sherlock Holmes, der das Dunkel aufklären soll. Dieser, nachdem er den Ort der Tat geprüft, zieht sich ins Nebenzimmer zurück, um zu überlegen. Unterdessen erwacht Max unter einer Menge von Kränzen und wieder gänzlich frisch, ohne sich um seine Eltern zu kümmern, klettert er aus dem Fenster und sucht seine Freunde im Café auf. Aber Sherlock Holmes, der die Spur des Flüchtlings gefunden, glaubt mit dem Verbrecher zu tun zu haben und packt Max am Kragen, stolz den Eltern den Mörder ihres Sohnes zu bringen. Das köstlichste kommt nun in der Erkennungsszene mit den Eltern, wo der allzuschlaue Sherlock Holmes zur Heiterkeit des gesamten Auditoriums einsieht, daß er diesmal sich selbst gründlich hineingelegt hat. (Der deutsche Lichtbildtheater-Besitzer, 17.11.1910)

                 ————————————————————————————————————

This farce works up to a laughable climax, and shows how Max came home after the night before and after various misconceptions of time, place and action, attempted target practice in his chamber. He fell exhausted in a stupor and, his parents entering, imagined that he had been murdered. They sent for the police, and early the next morning a pupil of Sherlock Holmes appeared and Max saw him examine the ground and obtain possession of one of his hairs and his cuff buttons. After the detective had gone Max made his escape out the window and was followed by the detective. The hair being found to match and the cuff buttons being missing, Max was arrested as his own murderer. At the station house the parents straightened things out. (The New York Dramatic Mirror, Mar. 3, 1911)

                 ————————————————————————————————————

Après une joyeuse bombe, Max rentre ivre chez lui et s’amuse à revolveriser ses objets d’art. Il roule, l’arme à ses côtés, au milieu de son désordre et le lendemain matin les parents au désespoir, croyant leur fils assassiné, recourent aux lumières du célèbre policier Scherlock Holmès. Celui-ci, après un minutieux examen du théâtre du crime, se retire dans une pièce voisine pour réfléchir. Pendant ce temps, Max se réveille sous un monceau de couronnes mortuaires et, tout à fait dégrisé et peu soucieux d’encourir la semonce paternelle, il en­jambe la balustrade et va retrouver ses camarades au café voisin. Mais l’illustre Scherlock, après avoir relevé la piste du fuyard et croyant avoir affaire au criminel, lui met la main au collet et, tout fier, ramène aux parents l’assassin de leur fils. Les parents se jettent alors dans les bras de l’assassin présumé au nez de l’illustre policier confondu. (Henri Bousquet, Catalogue Pathé des années 1896 à 1914, Bures-sur-Yvette, Editions Henri Bousquet, 1994-2004)

 

 

 

* Note: La première sortie en France semble être le 9. Déc. 1910.

Eine Kopie des Films wird verwahrt in: bfi/National Film and Television Archive (London)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNTERTITEL:

 

1.) Jemand ist getötet worden. - 2.) Wer ist der Täter. - 3.) Am folgenden Tag. - 4.) Brief. - 5.) Kommen Sie sofort, dank meinem wunderbaren Spürsinn habe ich den Mörder Ihres Sohnes gefunden. - 6.) Da ist er. (Zensurkarte Berlin Nr.8640, 12.10.1910)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weitere Filmbeschreibungen/Kritiken:

 

Nach einem vergnügten Abend kehrt Max betrunken heim und amüsiert sich damit, die Kunstgegenstände im Zimmer mit dem Revolver zu bedrohen. Er rollt schließlich, die Waffe zur Seite, inmitten der Unordnung zur Erde und am folgenden Morgen erblicken ihn seine verzweifeltNach einem vergnügten Abend kehrt Max betrunken heim und amüsiert sich damit, die Kunstgegenstände im Zimmer mit dem Revolver zu bedrohen. Er rollt schließlich, die Waffe zur Seite, inmitten der Unordnung zur Erde und am folgenden Morgen erblicken ihn seine verzweifelten Eltern. Sie glauben, ihr Sohn sei ermordet worden und holen den berühmten Detektiv Sherlock Holmes, der das Dunkel aufklären soll. Dieser, nachdem er den Ort der Tat geprüft, zieht sich ins Nebenzimmer zurück, um zu überlegen. Unterdessen erwacht Max unter einer Menge von Kränzen und wieder gänzlich frisch, ohne sich um seine Eltern zu kümmern, klettert er aus dem Fenster und sucht seine Freunde im Café auf. Aber der schlaue Sherlock Holmes, der die Spur des Flüchtlings gefunden, glaubt mit dem Verbrecher zu tun zu haben und packt Max am Kragen, stolz den Eltern den Mörder ihres Sohnes zu bringen. Die Szene schließt, wie man errät: Vater und Mutter stürzen in die Arme des Totgeglaubten zur Verwunderung des schlauen Detektivs. (Der Komet, 19.11.1910)

                 —————————————————————

A wild carouse has ended in Max returning unsteadily home. Instead of retiring to bed he practises revolver shooting, breaking various little statuettes with delighted self-appreciation. At length he tumbles into a huddled heap on the floor, and his parents rush inA wild carouse has ended in Max returning unsteadily home. Instead of retiring to bed he practises revolver shooting, breaking various little statuettes with delighted self-appreciation. At length he tumbles into a huddled heap on the floor, and his parents rush in. They find their son apparently without sign of life, and enlist the services of Shamluck Holmes to discover the perpetrator of the deed. Max awakens beneath a mass of wreaths and epitaphs. After pinching himself for a few moments the true situation dawns upon him. Then he resumes his position on the bed. The detective enters, makes an examination of the room, and departs. Max jumps up and makes his way to his café. The detective returns, observes a footmark, and is soon on the track of Max. He arrests him at the café, carries him off to the police-station, and then phones to the parents. Needless to say both hurry off to the station, and on Max being produced as the murderer, fall overjoyed into his arms. (The Bioscope, Oct. 27th 1910)

                 —————————————————————

Max Linder in the limelight again. Returns home beastly intoxicated and with a loaded revolver shoots at various articles in his room. He is found on the floor with the pistol in his hand, apparently dead. Some amusing situations arise. Max gives a good display of his ability as a picture comedian. (Variety, March 4th 1911)

                 —————————————————————

Max has been off on a terrible toot, and when he gets home he proceeds to break up housekeeping. Retiring to his own room he shoots the head off a bust of Psyche and breaks up things generally. Finally going to sleep in the midst of this chaos, be presents the appearance of having been murdered. His parents rush in and find him thus, and, grief-stricken, send for the police. Professor Searchem, the prize pupil of Sherlock Holmes, gets on the job, and by a series of extremely clever deductions, catches the assassin and takes him to his office and summons the victim's parents to see this awful criminal. What the detective's sensations are when the parents discover that the man whom he has arrested is their own beloved son, whom they thought dead, and who in the meantime had come to life and started out on a new round of pleasure, is difficult to describe. The film is a scream from start to finish. (The Film Index, Feb. 25, 1911; Moving Picture World, Feb. 25, 1911; The Billboard, Feb. 25, 1911)

No American can appreciate the French brand of humor as depicted in film comedy. To the American the Pathe comedy film made on the other side and imported to America is the veriest horse play. The breaking up of furniture and dishes seems to be the stock incident upon which the French film producer depends entirely. Who killed Max? might please the French, but to Americans it's merely boring. (The Billboard, Mar. 4, 1911)

                 —————————————————————

A slap-stick comedy in which the house is wrecked and disturbance is created all along the line. As a rough house it is a success, but otherwise it has few claims to serious consideration. (Moving Picture World, Mar. 11, 1911)

                 —————————————————————

A very funny piece full of comicalities and wit. The plot is rich - as good a burlesque on the detective story as was ever contrived. It is a little masterpiece of wit and ingenuity, typically French. Max was in it - to say which is enough; but it must be added that he scores one of the biggest successes of his career. (The Nickelodeon, Mar. 4, 1911)

                 —————————————————————

As delightful a piece of nonsense as Max has achieved of late. I, only I, don't like death-mockery, even if a genius, like Max, does it. (Moving Picture News, Mar. 18, 1911)