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Le soulier trop petit

Weitere Titel: Max hat neue Stiefel an (D, Ö)/ When the shoe pinches (UK)/ Max's feet are pinched (USA) - Länge: 155m - s/w - Interpret: Max Linder - Produktion: Pathé Frères - Katalog-Nr.: 3952/Nov.10 - UA: 29. Oktober 1910 (Österreich, Auff. in „Grand Kinematograf Orient“/Prag am 11.11.1910) — Weitere Auff.: 3.12.10 (Berlin/ Excelsior-Lichtspiele); 23.12.10 (Paris/ Omnia Pathé)

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Max will seiner Braut gefallen und kauft sich ein Paar eleganter Schuhe; aber nicht zu seiner Freude, denn auf halbem Wege muß er den einen Schuh ausziehen um seine Zehen von dem Druck zu befreien. Er zieht ihn erst wieder im Hause seiner Braut an. Während des Essens zieht Max, der wieder schreckliche Qualen erleidet, die Stiefel aus. Unglücklicherweise nimmt ein Hund den Schuh fort. Nach dem Essen begibt sich der junge Mann in den Salon, den unbeschuhten Fuß soviel wie möglich verbergend. Plötzlich kommt der Hund mit dem Schuh in der Schnauze wieder. Es entsteht zwischen ihm und dem Hunde um den Besitz des Stiefels eine wüste Balgerei, in deren Verlaufe Max auf die Straße gesetzt wird. (Der deutsche Lichtbildtheater-Besitzer, 1.12.1910)

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Max Linder has worked nearly the same idea before, but he is always so much of a delight and so unconsciously original and graceful in his movements that the story takes on a new appearance. He buys a pair of tight shoes and visits his best girl at her home, where he takes off his shoe at the table and a dog runs away with it. His troubles end in a smash-up, which is forgiven because it is Max Linder. (The New York Dramatic Mirror, Mar. 22, 1911)

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Max veut plaire à sa fiancée. Il fait donc l’acquisition de souliers très chics, dans lesquels, après de nombreux efforts, il parvient à pénétrer, mais non à séjourner, car, à moitié chemin, le beau Max, obligé de libérer ses orteils, quitte le soulier tortionnaire pour le réintégrer seulement en entrant chez sa fiancée. Pendant le dîner, le malheureux qui souffre le martyre quitte de nouveau son soulier. Par malheur, Médor, le caniche de la maison, s’en empare délicatement pour jouer avec et, après le repas, le jeune homme désolé, passe au salon en cachant tant bien que mal son pied déchaussé. Tout à coup, Médor fait irruption le soulier dans sa gueule. Coup de théâtre! Max découvert, est chassé de la maison et du cœur de sa fiancée. (Henri Bousquet, Catalogue Pathé des années 1896 à 1914, Bures-sur-Yvette, Editions Henri Bousquet, 1994-2004)

 

 

 

Anmerkung/Note: Remake of Chaussure trop étroit (1907)

Eine Kopie des Films wird verwahrt in: Cineteca del Friuli (Gemona), Museum of Modern Art (New York), Cinémathèque Québecoise (Montreal), National Film and Sound Archive, Australia (Canberra), Österreichisches Filmmuseum (Wien), Lobster Films (Paris)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weitere Filmbeschreibungen/Kritiken:

 

Max has become engaged to a charming girl, and he adorns himself with unusual care when dressing for dinner. His shoes are the only part of his attire with which he is not satisfied, and on his way to his fiancée's house, he buys another pair. Unfortunately his new acquisitions are a trifle tight, and he suffers some excruciating agony. At dinner, things are scarcely better, and Max gently slips one shoe off under the table, and then devotes himself to his fair companion. Unluckily, Brisk, the pet poodle of the house, walks in, and picking up the shoe, trots away with it. Max finds that his shoe has vanished, and not knowing what else to do, he snatches up a wine basket and shuffles into the drawing room. A few painful moments elapse, and then the dog appears with the shoe in his mouth. Max tries to take it from him, but Brisk refuses to part with his find. Max's shoeless condition is observed by his companions, and he is obliged to admit his vanity, which ends in his fiancée giving him his dismissal. (The Bioscope, Nov. 10th 1910)

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Max is invited to the home of his sweetheart for dinner, and as he dresses he finds that his shoes are scarcely all that they should be, so he decides to invest in a new pair. Slipping out of the house in a pair of carpet slippers, he makes his way to the nearest shoe store, and after considerable time, gets a pair of shoes which the shoemaker assures him are a perfect fit. Although they are a trifle tight. Max decides to accept them and proceeds on his way. Every step brings its quota of pain, and finally in desperation Max takes off the shoe that hurts the worst and ambles along in his stocking feet. Arriving at his sweetheart's house, he slips his shoe on, but suffers so much that it is necessary to take it off again. While at the dinner table, his sweetheart's pet dog runs off with it and Max is in a dilemma. Finally he fits a wine basket on his foot and gets along very favorably until the guests commence to dance. Just how Max accomplishes this stunt and how he regains possession of his shoe makes a most interesting film. (The Film Index, Mar. 18, 1911; Moving Picture World, Mar. 18, 1911)

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Such comedies as this scarcely have a place in modern motion picture work. It is possible that a man might purchase shoes that pinched his feet. It is altogether improbable that he would keep those shoes, much less wear them to a reception when it had already been necessary to remove them once. There is, perhaps, a certain degree of fun connected with such pictures, maybe largely because of their improbability, but it must be confessed that more probable subjects ought to be available. The Pathes waste a good deal of excellent film and much good work upon improbabilities which they denominate humorous pictures. (Moving Picture World, Mar. 25, 1911)

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Max visits his girl, but his tight shoes cause him agonies. At dinner he slips one off and a dog runs away with it. Max tries to get his foot covering but the dog refuses to part with the find, and there is a disturbance followed by Max's undignified dismissal from the house. (Kinematograph Monthly Film Record, June 1913)