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Les trois voisins

Weitere Titel: Die drei Nachbarn (D, Ö)/ The three neighbors (UK, USA) - Länge: 135m - Interpret: Max Linder? - Produktion: Pathé Frères - Katalog-Nr.: 3050/Sept.09 - Auf.: 21. September 1909 (Rio de Janeiro/ Cinema-Pathé)  ̶  Weitere Auff.: 24.9.09 (Wien/ Gisela-Theater "Weltbild"); 9.10.09 (Orléans/ Nouveau Cirque d'Orléans)

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A man and a girl occupying the same apartment house spend a good deal of their time hanging out of their respective windows, billing and cooing to their hearts' content. Another tenant in the same building, of a curious turn of mind, gets lots of fun hanging out of his window and listening to the lovers' nonsense. One fine day, however, the girl's father catches her flirting with the young man next door and, taking her severely to task, sends her off to her room, weeping. The curious neighbor, hearing angry voices below, decides that something interesting is transpiring so lets himself out of his window, and when he reaches the one below peeps in to see what is going on. The girl's father is seated before his safe, counting his money, of which there are great piles all around him. The curious neighbor's eyes glisten at the sight of so much wealth. The old man, with a smile of satisfaction on his old, wrinkled face, sits fingering the precious coin, when, all of a sudden, a sound from his daughter's room attracts him and, jumping up hastily, he leaves the room. This is the curious neighbor's chance. Without losing a minute, he jumps in the window and carries off all the coin and notes he can carry and makes a hasty retreat to his own quarters, where he hides his ill-gotten treasure beneath the flooring. Now the lover of the young girl on the ground floor is making an elaborate toilet preparatory to visiting her father and boldly pressing his suit. When he reaches the domains of his beloved one, he finds everyone in a great state of excitement. The miserly father has just discovered that he has been robbed and is almost frantic with grief over his misfortune. When he catches a glimpse of his would-be son-in-law at such an inopportune moment the sight seems to increase his rage, and he rushes at him and throws him out of the place. The disappointed and heartbroken lover returns to his rooms, where he decides to make away with himself, and we soon see him swinging from the gas fixture. In a twinkling, however, the gas fixture loosens and the ceiling comes down and with it a shower of gold (the spoil of the tenant over him, who hid the old man's money under the flooring). Dazed for a minute, he gathers it together and, realizing in a sort of hazy way that this must be the old man's wealth that was stolen, he hurries back with it to the owner, who, of course, has now only words of gratitude to bestow on him. But the lover does not want the old gent's gratitude; he wants his daughter, and he gets her as a reward for his honesty. (The Film Index, Dec. 4, 1909)

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Trois fenêtres voisines s’ouvrent, livrant passage, au rez-de-chaussée à deux amoureux qui se mettent à roucouler, au premier à un individu louche qui les épie. Paraît le père de la jeune fille, qui tance vertement celle-ci et l’envoie pleurer dans sa chambre. Pendant ce temps, l’individu du premier enjambe la balustrade, se laisse glisser dans la rue et observe ce qui se passe chez ses voisins: le père de la jeune amoureuse, ayant ouvert son coffre-fort, palpe son trésor avec des gestes d’avare. Mais soudain, il prête une oreille inquiète et se dirige hâtivement vers la chambre de sa fille. Le quidam en profite pour pénétrer et faire main basse sur les valeurs qu’il s’empresse d’aller cacher dans sa chambre sous une lame du parquet. Immédiatement au-dessous, l’amoureux en grande toilette, se prépare à aller faire sa demande en mariage. Mais son voisin, qui vient de découvrir le vol, le reçoit à coups de pieds et le prétendant, désespéré, rentre dans sa chambre et se pend au piton de la suspension. Patatras! le piton cède avec une grande partie du plafond et le pendu roule à terre sous une pluie d’or et de billets de banque. Il ramasse cette fortune qui lui tombe si à propos du ciel et court chez son voisin. Celui-ci, trop heureux de rentrer dans ses biens, accède enfin au désir des deux jeunes gens et les unit. (Henri Bousquet, Catalogue Pathé des années 1896 à 1914, Bures-sur-Yvette, Editions Henri Bousquet, 1994-2004)

 

 

 

Angekündigt/ billed/ annoncé: "Os tres vizinhos (fita comica por Max Linder)", IMPRENSA, 24. Dez. 1912. The BIOSCOPE didn't mention an identification of Linder in its review of this film, while, on the same page, praising "Mr. Linder's fascinating personality", in its review of "A young Lady-Killer" (/Le petit jeune homme), nor did Richard Abel in his book 'The Ciné goes to Town' (1994).

Eine Kopie des Films wird verwahrt in: Em Gee Film Library (Los Angeles)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weitere Filmbeschreibungen/Kritiken:

 

The daughter of an old miser is in love with the youth next door, but her father bundles her from the window, whence she has been making amorous signs, and then proceeds to count his hoarded wealth. While doing so, he is watched by the occupant of the floor above – a rascally looking individual – who, immediately the old man leaves the room, enters by the window and seizes the money, burying it beneath the floor of his room, which is directly above the bedroom of the young lover. The latter enters to ask the father for his daughter's hand, but is angrily refused and summarily ejected, the theft having been just discovered. In despair, the luckless swain prepares to hang himself, tying a rope to a hook in the ceiling and standing upon a chair, from which eminence he delivers a few last remarks to the unkind world. Then he leaps into space; but, instead of being strangled, he falls to the ground, bringing with him a portion of the ceiling and a shower of gold and bank notes. He immediately rushes to the old man and restores what he rightly guesses to be the stolen property, receiving in exchange the lady of his desire. (The Bioscope, Sep. 2, 1909)

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The Pathe comedians have presented in this film a remarkably clever story, well handled, except in one small particular. A young man in love with the daughter of an old miser is repeatedly ordered from the latter's apartments, which are located in the same building with his own. Overhead in another apartment lives a thief, who robs the miser and secrets the money under the floor of his bedroom. The love-sick chap attempts suicide by hanging, having tied the rope to the gas fixtures, but his weight pulls down the ceiling and mixed with the plaster is the stolen plunder of the thief. He gathers up the money too hastily and carelessly to he quite convincing, and restores it to the miser, thus gaining the old man's consent to marriage with the daughter. (New York Dramatic Mirror, Dec. 11, 1909)

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How an undesirable suitor wins out with his sweetheart's father by restoring his stolen watch, which the young man finds when in the act of hanging himself. A man and a girl occupying the same apartment house spend a good deal of their time hanging out of their respective windows billing and cooing to their heart's content. Another tenant in the same building, of a curious turn of mind, gets lots of fun hanging out of his window and listening to the lovers' nonsense. One fine day, however, the girl's father catches her flirting with the young man next door and takes her severely to task and sends her off to her room weeping. The curious neighbor hearing angry voices below decides that something interesting is transpiring, so lets himself out of his window, and when he reaches the one below peeps in to see what is going on. The girl's father is seated before his safe counting his money, of which there are great piles all around him. The curious neighbor's eyes glisten at the sight of so much wealth. The old man, with a smile of satisfaction on his old, wrinkled face, sits fingering the precious coin, when all of a sudden a sound from his daughter's room attracts him and, jumping up hastily, he leaves the room. This is the curious neighbor's chance. Without losing a minute he jumps in the window and carries off all the coin and notes he can carry and makes a hasty retreat to his own quarters, where he hides his ill-gotten treasure beneath the flooring. Now the lover of the young girl on the ground floor is making an elaborate toilet preparatory to visiting her father and boldly pressing his suit. When he reaches the domains of his beloved one, he finds everyone in a great state of excitement. The miserly father has just discovered that he has been robbed and is frantic with grief over his misfortune. When he catches a glimpse of his would-be son-in-law at such an inopportune moment the sight seems to increase his rage, and he rushes at him and throws him out of the place. The disappointed and heart-broken lover returns to his rooms, where he decides to make away with himself, and we soon see him swinging to the gas fixture. In a twinkling, however, the gas fixture loosens and the celling comes down, and with it a shower of gold (the spoil of the tenant over him who hid the old man's money under the flooring). Dazed for a minute, he gathers it together and realizing in a sort of hazy way that this must be the old man's wealth that was stolen he hurries back with it to the owner, who, of course, has now only words of gratitude to bestow on him. But the lover does not want the old gent's gratitude; he wants his daughter, and he gets her as a reward for his honesty. (Moving Picture World, Dec. 4, 1909)

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In America few men commit suicide, or attempt it, because they can't have the girl they want. They either carry off the one they do want, despite the attempt of the parents to prevent it, or they go find another. Abroad suicide or some equally desperate deed seems to be the usual stunt for disappointed lovers. In this particular instance, after the young man had been thrown out by the irate father, he attempts to hang himself from a hook in the ceiling. The whole thing comes down and he discovers that he has unwittingly broken into the hiding place of the thief who carried away his prospective father-in-law's wealth. And so he gets the girl for finding the money and all are happy ever after. (Moving Picture World, Dec. 18, 1909)