voriger Film  <<          Filme            >>  nächster Film  

 

Trop aimée

Weitere Titel: Der verliebte Max und seine Hunde (D, Ö)/ Affectionate Pets (UK)/ Max is almost married (USA) - Regie: (Max Linder) - Szenario: Max Linder - Länge: 180m - s/w, teilweise viragiert - Interpret: Max Linder - Produktion: Pathé Frères - Katalog-Nr.: 3821/Sept.10 - UA: 2. September 1910 (Wien/ Graben Kino) — Weitere Auff.: 4.10.10 (Hamburg/ Waterloo-Theater); 27.10.10 (Paris/ Cinéma du "Petit Journal")*

                 ————————————————————————————————————

Soviel Glück wie Max hat noch lange nicht jeder; er liest die Heiratsanzeige einer jungen Millionärin, geht hin, stellt sich vor, und .... hat Glück. Aber des Lebens ungemischte Freude, ward keinem Sterblichen zuteil. Die Dame hat drei große Hunde, die Max, indem sie den Konkurrenten vermuten, nicht sehen könne, und wie diese ihm schließlich all sein Hoffen zunichte machen, zeigt dieses Bild. (Der deutsche Lichtbildtheater-Besitzer, 29.9.1910)

                 ————————————————————————————————————

The versatile Max Linder heads a novel chase in this film, the pursuers being three dogs, the pets of the comedian's fiancée. Max was dreadfully afraid of dogs anyhow, and of these dogs in particular, because they were jealous when their mistress caressed Max. On the wedding day he had them locked up, but they escaped and ran to the parlor, where the ceremony was in progress. Max fled through numberless streets, houses, rooms, and finally to the roof, where he gave up and sent back a note by the dogs declining to marry and be devoured. The picture amuses. (The New York Dramatic Mirror, Jan. 18, 1911)

                 ————————————————————————————————————

Max est dans une situation financière embarrassée lorsqu’il lit dans son journal cet avis: “Une jeune millionnaire américaine désirerait épouser un jeune homme de bonne famille.” Max se précipite chez la dame et s’aperçoit avec plaisir qu’elle est jeune et charmante. Mais les chiens familiers de la demoiselle sentant en Max un rival grognent après lui. Cependant tout va bien et le jour du mariage est fixé. Max persuade alors sa fiancée d’enfermer ses favoris et ainsi il peut pousser un soupir de soulagement. Malheureusement les fidèles animaux se précipitent dans la pièce où les invités sont réunis. Apercevant Max, ils se précipitent sur lui et l’obligent à s’enfuir. Finalement, Max est obligé de se réfugier sur le toit. Là, il griffonne à la hâte ce mot: “Je préfère renoncer à votre main plutôt qu’être dévoré par vos chiens.” Ceux-ci semblent le comprendre et courent à leur maîtresse. (Henri Bousquet, Catalogue Pathé des années 1896 à 1914, Bures-sur-Yvette, Editions Henri Bousquet, 1994-2004)

 

 

 

* Note: La première sortie en France semble être le 21. Oct. 1910.

Eine Kopie des Films wird verwahrt in: Archives du Film du CNC (Bois d'Arcy), Cinémathèque Québecoise (Montreal), bfi/National Film and Television Archive (London), Lobster Films (Paris) Der Film wurde veröffentlicht auf DVD "Aux sources du burlesque cinématographique: les comiques français des premiers temps" (Supplement to: 1895, No.61) Ein Ausschnitt des Films wurde veröffentlicht auf DVD "The Comedy of Max Linder" (Max Fears the Dogs, 1909, 2:49) Ein Ausschnitt des Films ist enthalten in: L'homme au chapeau de soie (Dokumentation, 1983).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weitere Filmbeschreibungen/Kritiken:

 

Max is in an embarrassed financial condition, and reads with delight the following: „A young American millionairess desires to marry a man of good family.“ Max calls upon the lady, and is pleased to find she is both young and charming. The lady's pets, seeing in Max a rival in their mistress's affections, growl at him. Everything goes well, and the day is fixed. The lady is persuaded to have her pets locked up, and Max breathes a sigh of relief. But the faithful animals scamper into the room where the guests have assembled. Seeing Max, they spring at him, and he rushes out. Finally, Max is brought to bay on a roof, and he scribbles a note: „I fear I would much sooner give you up than be devoured by your canine friends.“ This he proffers to the foremost dog, and they all run off to their mistress. (The Bioscope, Sept. 8th 1910)

                 —————————————————————

Max Linder, back on the job, after a recent illness, does some excellent comedy work, and the idea of the dapper young man being prevented from being married through the jealousy of her canine pets, is an amusing one. (Variety, Jan. 21st 1911)

                 —————————————————————

The inimitable Max hails with delight the opportunity to marry a rich millionairess, and is pleased to find that she is both young and charming. The lady seems equally impressed with Max. But "the course of true love never did run smooth." The lady's canine pets threaten to prove an obstacle to Max's happiness. Their mistress will not be parted from them, and they see in Max a rival to their mistress's affections. However, everything goes well, and the wedding day is fixed. Max breaths a sigh of relief when he is told that the pets will be locked up during the ceremony. But the faithful animals chafe at the unusual restraint, and finally, bursting the kennel door, scamper joyfully into the drawing room, where the wedding guests are assembled. Max, distraught with fear, when the dogs jump at him, rushes wildly out, and away run the dogs after him. Finally Max is brought to bay on a roof. Tearing a leaf from his pocketbook he scribbles a note, "I fear I would much sooner give you up than be devoured by your pets." This he tremblingly proffers to the foremost dog, and they all run off to their mistress. She is not brokenhearted; indeed, it seems obvious that she would lament the loss of her dogs more than she would that of her husband. (The Film Index, Jan. 14, 1911)

                 —————————————————————

Max is about to marry an heiress, who keeps several large dogs, who see in Max a rival to her affections. They have been locked up for the wedding, but escaping from their kennel, go for poor Max just as the ceremony is about to begin. He certainly has great trouble to get away from them, and finally prefers to give up his heiress than be devoured by her dogs. (The Billboard, Jan. 14, 1911)

                 —————————————————————

Max is not as funny as usual in this film because he doesn't have a very good chance. He is out shown by three dog actors who carry off the honors of the performance. They are three star dogs who act with great precision and apparent intelligence. They give Max a hot and merry chase and finally get his goat. There is a rather silly picture at the end where the heiress bestows caresses on one of her pets. The dog appeared not to like it. (The Nickelodeon, Jan. 21, 1911)

                 —————————————————————

Welcome back, Max! Thrice welcome. We don't always agree, but as man to man – the cynic drops his mark – your name on a film and I prepare to enjoy myself. He nearly gets married, he would have done but for some dogs (aside, that saved him from going to the dogs). Lots of real laughs in this “split.” (Moving Picture News, Jan. 28, 1911)