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La vengeance du bottier

Weitere Titel: Die Rache des Schuhhändlers (D, Ö)/ The Bootmaker's Revenge (UK)/ One on Max (USA) - Szenario: Max Linder - Länge: 175m - s/w, teilweise viragiert - 2 UT - Interpreten: Max Linder {Max}; Jacques Vandenne {der Schuhhändler}; Marguerite Montavon {Marthe Labaste} - Produktion: Pathé Frères - Katalog-Nr.: 3239/Dez.09 - Auff.: 25. November 1909 (Prag/ Grand Kinematograf Orient) — Weitere Auff.: 24.12.09 (Hamburg/ Waterloo-Theater); 28.1.10 (Paris/ Le Cirque d'Hiver)

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Komische Szene von Max Linder. Gespielt von Herrn Max Linder vom Théâtre des Variétés, Herrn Vandenne vom Théâtre du Châtelet, Fräulein Montavon vom Théâtre du Gymnase. Max wird von seinem Schwiegervater in spe zu einem Diner eingeladen, bei dem er sich verloben soll. Er zieht sich seine beste Garderobe an, nur die Schuhe passen nicht. Rasch entschlossen eilt er zum nächsten Schuster und flirtet mit dessen junger Frau. Doch der biedere Hans Sachs versteht keinen Spaß. Er zwängt ihn in Rollschuhe und stößt ihn auf die Straße. Was nun dem Armen, der immer und überall hinfällt, alles passiert, ist wirklich urkomisch. (Neues Wiener Journal, 12.12.1909)

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No farce that Max Linder has ever appeared in so well illustrates his exclusive capabilities as this one, the reason being that it is impossible to imagine any other picture comedian who would not have made the farce silly. With Linder, however, it is a continuous laugh. He has been invited to call on his fiancée and, finding his shoes too tight, goes to a shoe store for another pair. Here he flirts with the proprietor's wife, and the husband gets even by nailing a pair of roller skates to the new shoes, lacing the shoes securely on Max's feet and then kicking Max into the street. The apparently genuine efforts of the comedian to keep erect on his way to his fiancée's house and after his arrival constitute the fun. (The New York Dramatic Mirror, Oct. 26, 1910)

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Max doit faire son entrée officielle chez sa future épouse. Il met son plus bel habit mais s’aperçoit qu’il n’a pas de bottines en bon état. Il sort et entre chez un bottier mais il est surpris faisant la cour à la femme. Le bottier, pour se venger, place sous ses souliers une paire de patins à roulettes et le pousse dans la rue. Après avoir fait des efforts désespérés pour ne pas tomber de par les rues, il appelle un taxi et se fait transporter chez ses futurs beaux-parents. Là, il se tient assis mais lorsqu’il essaye de se lever, c’est la catastrophe. Enfin, quelqu’un suggère qu’on lui enlève ses bottines! (Henri Bousquet, Catalogue Pathé des années 1896 à 1914, Bures-sur-Yvette, Editions Henri Bousquet, 1994-2004)

 

 

 

Eine Kopie des Films wird verwahrt in: bfi/National Film and Television Archive (London), Deutsche Kinemathek (Berlin)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNTERTITEL:

 

1) Wie er sich rächt. - 2) Sie hätten nur die Stiefel auszuziehen. (Zensurkarte Berlin Nr.5033, 24.11.1909)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weitere Filmbeschreibungen/Kritiken:

 

Max will heute Verlobung feiern und zu dieser Feier natürlich recht elegant aussehen. Er wendet daher die größte Sorgfalt auf seine Toilette an; da seine Stiefel nicht recht passend sind, geht er auf dem Wege zu seiner Braut noch zu seinem Schuhmacher. Dort macht er die Entdeckung, daß die Frau des Schuhmachers recht nett ist, und als letzterer verschiedene Kästen mit Stiefeln heranschleppt, findet er seine Frau in zärtlicher Unterhaltung mit seinem Kunden. Der Kaufmann hält seinen Zorn würdevoll zurück, doch er schwört, sich zu rächen. Zu diesem Zweck befestigt er an den Sohlen seines Kunden Rollen und läßt ihn so seiner Wege gehen. Der junge Mann gerät natürlich in's Wanken und versucht vergeblich, sich im Gleichgewicht zu halten. Er ruft eine Droschke herbei und langt mit Hilfe dieser endlich bei seinen zukünftigen Schwiegereltern in einem bedauernswerten Zustande an. Die Braut hält ihn für betrunken, und ihr strenger Vater jagt den unwürdigen Bewerber aus dem Hause. Er gesteht nun sein Unglück ein und wird wieder in Gnaden aufgenommen. (Der deutsche Lichtbildtheater-Besitzer, 30.12.1909)

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Conceived and executed by Mr. Max Linder, this little play makes a notable addition to Messrs. Pathe's library of humour. The plot is slight but gives Mr. Linder an opportunity for those antics and extravagances amongst which he is so particularly at home. As an engaged young man he is about to visit his fiancée and he has just finished dressing when he discovers that his boots pinch. So to the bootmaker he hies and there purchases some others, but, with his usual helplessness in the region of petticoats, be cannot resist indulging in love assuages with the shopkeeper's wife. The outraged spouse determines to revenge himself and accordingly affixes a pair of roller skates to the youth's boots. Before the young gallant is aware of the plot, therefore, he is carried outside the shop and left to straddle on the pavement. His wild endeavours to make progress and his equal incapability when he arrives at his destination, having been borne there in a cab, are highly diverting, and it is not until a friend makes the suggestion that he realises the simple and obvious remedy of removing his boots. (The Bioscope, Dec. 9th 1909)

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A familiar Pathe figure endeavours to create laughter with some attempted comedy on roller skates. Mark. (Variety, Oct. 22nd 1910)

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This time Max appears in the character of a newly engaged man, dressing with particular care to make his official entry, as it were, into the bride-elect's family. Unluckily his shoes are a wee bit tight. He resigns himself to a momentary inconvenience, and. putting on his slippers, sallies forth to purchase a new pair of shoes on his way to his fiancée's home. But, alas! for the constancy of man. Max is soon making love to the wife of the storekeeper, who, out of revenge, screws a pair of roller skates tightly on to the boots with which he is about to shoe his customer. Thus equipped, he pushes Max into the street, and his efforts to maintain his equilibrium, and to capture his silk hat, which has rolled off, makes a sight worth seeing. Failing to get the skates off, he takes a cab, into which he is assisted by the driver. Arriving at his destination he makes a precipitous entry. Once seated on a chair he refuses to move, but is persuaded to take his place among the dancers, where his erratic movements cause considerable alarm. At last he relates his adventure, and amidst bursts of general laughter, some one suggests that the obvious remedy is to take the shoes off. (The Nickelodeon, Oct. 15, 1910; The Film Index, Oct. 22, 1910; Moving Picture World, Oct. 22, 1910)

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A comedy which offers a novel situation in sending a young man to see his girl with roller skates on. Of course all sorts of comical and disturbing things happen to him on the way, and after he arrives. But the skates are fastened to his shoes and it is difficult to prescribe a remedy until some genius suggests that the shoes be removed. Happy thought which solves the difficult problem without further complications. Puerile comedy, but it evoked laughter. (Moving Picture World, Oct. 29, 1910)

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Max sallies forth to purchase a pair of new shoes. At the store Max is soon making love to the proprietor's wife. The husband, out of revenge, screws a pair of roller skates tightly on the boots, with which he is about to shoe his customer. Thus equipped, he pushes Max into the street, and his efforts to maintain his equilibrium, and to capture his silk hat, which has rolled off, are ludicrous. (The Billboard, Oct. 22, 1910)